NEW YEAR - OLD TRADITION - TRAVEL EDITION

NEW YEAR IS THE TIME OR DAY AT WHICH A NEW CALENDAR YEAR BEGINS

NEW YEAR IS THE TIME OR DAY AT WHICH A NEW CALENDAR YEAR BEGINS

Has this thought ever crossed your mind, that how people across the globe welcome the new year, what tradition do they follow? Yes, right. From drinking ashes to breaking pomegranates on the grounds, there are  some fun and surprising traditions that are followed  by people. So, let's take a look at how people usher in the new year and hopefully you will also find your amusing traditions among these! 

 

SPAIN-  EAT GRAPES FOR GOOD FORTUNE

EAT GRAPES FOR GOOD FORTUNE

People in Spain eat 12 pieces of grapes to bring in good fortune at midnight to honour the late 19th century old tradition. An old tale is believed that back in the 1800s, vine growers in the Alicante area started this tradition of selling more grapes, which later on turned into the sweet celebration. Today people at the stroke of midnight start eating one grape for each 12 bell strokes in a hope that this year will bring in luck and prosperity throughout the year.

 

SCOTLAND- FIRST FOOTING

FIRST FOOTING

The day before January 1 matters a lot to the native, in fact they’ve given a name to this day as: Hogmanay. Among many other traditions that are followed here in Scotland, people follow this “First step” tradition very ardently. According to Scottish belief, the first person who crosses the threshold of your house on New Year’s Day should be a dark-haired male if you wish to have good-luck for the coming year. Traditionally, these men are believed to come bearing gifts like salt, coal and whiskey which are considered as an add-on to good fortune. But why dark-haired men? An old tale states that when Vikings were invading Scotland, they all hoped not to see any light-haired man with a giant axe. Hence, a dark-haired man with gifts  symbolises opulence and success.

 

THE NETHERLANDS: CHEWING ON THE OLIEBOLLEN

CHEWING ON THE OLIEBOLLEN

This is slightly an odd tradition to follow, but the tale that made it happen is different. The Ancient Germanic Tribes ate these pieces of deep-fried dough balls so that when the Germanic Goddess Perchta, also known as belly slitter, fails to slit their stomachs because of these deep fried dough balls. so , today oliebollen is enjoyed by everyone on New Year’s Eve and if you visit the Netherlands at this time, every dutch street vendor will be seen with a cart full of these traditional dough-balls.


BRAZIL: THROWING WHITE FLOWERS INTO THE OCEAN

THROWING WHITE FLOWERS INTO THE OCEAN

If you’re thinking about spending your new year’s eve in Brazil, then you will be thrilled to see the ocean filled with white flowers and even candles. In the South American country, it is a routine of the citizens to make offerings to Yemoja, it is the water deity who is said to control the seas and to invoke her blessings for the whole year. 

 

ITALY: DON’T FORGET TO WEAR YOUR RED UNDERWEAR

Italians have a tradition of wearing red underpants to welcome the new year. In Italy, the colour red is associated with fertility and so, people wear this colour underneath their clothes in a hope to see their family grow. 

 

DENMARK: SMASHING PLATES

SMASHING PLATES

People in Denmark take pride in the number of broken plates outside their doors. On New year’s eve, it is a Danish tradition to throw china at your friends and neighbours' door. It is believed that, the more piles , the less grudges and ill-will behind the door and some say that, the bigger the pile, the more luck.

 

ARMENIA: BAKING “GOOD LUCK ” BREAD

BAKING “GOOD LUCK ” BREAD

When people in Armenia bake their last batch of bread on new year’s eve, they add “luck” in their dough, not literally but metaphorically and they knead it in a hope that next year will be full of luck and prosperity.

 

JAPAN: RING THE BELL/SLURPING SOME SOBA NOODLES

RING THE BELL/SLURPING SOME SOBA NOODLES

One hundred and eight, this is the number of times the buddhists ring the bells on New Year’s eve. 107 times when it's New Year’s Eve and one at midnight. Known as Joyanokane, this tradition is meant to ward off the 108 evil desires in each and every person and is meant to cleanse the sins of the previous year.  

Other than that, it is customary to start the new year with a bowl of soba noodles in a ritual known as “toshikoshi soba”or year-crossing noodles. These noodles are believed to signify long and healthy life because of their thin and long length.

 

GREECE: HANGING ONIONS/PUMMELING POMEGRANATE

When it comes to traditions and well-being, Greeks tops the chart. People of Greece believe that onion symbolises rebirth, so they hang pungent smelling vegetables on their doors to promote growth throughout the new year. Greek culture has linked this food and the idea of development together. And this vegetable has the character of putting its roots anywhere and growing. 

Practising more than one tradition, they also believe that pomegranates reflect fertility, life and abundance, thus this fruit is also associated with good fortune in Modern Greece. Just after midnight, it is customary for people in Greece to smash pomegranates against the doors of the house and the more seeds are scattered, the more fortune and good luck comes.

 

RUSSIA: PLANTING UNDERWATER TREES/ DRINKING ASHES

PLANTING UNDERWATER TREES/ DRINKING ASHES

In Russia, from the last 25 years, two Russian divers, Father Frost and The Ice Maiden have made this as their tradition to deep dive into the frozen lake Baikal which is the world’s largest freshwater lake and there they plant new year trees 100 feet below the surface. Although the surface is below freezing,  people from all over the place partake in this frozen gala on Russia’s New Year's Eve.

The other tradition that Russians happily follow is drinking champagne with a hint of ash in it. In Russian culture, it is said that folks can write their wishes down , burn them with a candle and mix the ashes in a glass to ring in the new year.

 

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Keeping it all aside, the holiday season and the mood is on top of the World so why don’t you visit your long-awaited destination that you kept postponing till now and embrace the traditions across the world. Book cheap flight tickets with Firstfly Travel or just call us at +1-866-383-9353 Or mail us at info@firstflytravel.com